This event is currently sold out. Please email us at info@openkitchenevents.com to be placed on our waiting list.

DATE: Saturday, February 1, 2020
TIME:
LOCATION: Open Kitchen Events, 112 W San Francisco, Suite 310, Santa Fe, NM

To celebrate the Vietnamese Lunar New Year 2020 (“Tết”) — The Year of the Metal Rat, Open Kitchen invites you to join us on Saturday, February 1, 2020 for a special evening of traditional feast foods that have been beautifully paired with Sakes from Floating World. Tết is the most important celebration of the Vietnamese culture and welcomes the arrival of spring and commences on the first day of the first month of the Lunar calendar, which falls on January 25, 2020 this year.

Chef-Owner Hue-Chan, who emigrated from Vietnam to the U.S. with her family in 1975, has designed a special multi-course New Year’s menu with dishes that have been shared within her family both in Vietnam and now here in the States — these recipes have been handed down and evolved with time and new experiences. Hue-Chan will curate each course and share its significance to the Vietnamese culture and culinary distinction.

Linda Tetrault, co-owner of Floating World and certified sake sommelier, who worked with Hue-Chan to pair the sakes, will be joining us to discuss the sakes.

A festive evening of Vietnamese traditional feast foods and uniquely paired sakes awaits you!

(Option for no Sake pairing is also available)

MENU

A Festive Welcome Reception
“Chả Giò” — Crispy Vietnamese Imperial Spring Rolls filled with crab meat, ground pork, shiitake mushroom, jicama, carrots, and glass noodles served with Nước Chấm, a Vietnamese traditional dipping sauce.
Paired with Kaze no Mori (“Wind of the Woods”) – Effervescent and bright. The nose on this magical brew is a unique collection of ricey, earthy, woody, banana, and pear aromas.

Red for Good Luck
“Xôi Gấc” — Sweet sticky rice steamed with coconut milk and gấc – an indigenous fruit grown in Vietnam known as “baby jackfruit” or “sweet gourd.” The bloody red color of the gấc pulp has an important role in Vietnamese culture to symbolize luck.
Paired with ‘Crazy Milk’ – Earthy notes with aromas of hay, grass, and woody. Sweet and rich on the palate, with a medium body and great balance. This sake is Nigori style, which means it is cloudy because the rice lees are reintroduced to the finished sake after it’s brewed.

New Beginnings
“Khổ Qua Nhồi Thịt” – Stewed bitter melon with ground pork, ginger, and shiitake mushroom to say goodbye the old and welcome the new
Paired with ‘Crazy Milk’ – Earthy notes with aromas of hay, grass, and woody. Sweet and rich on the palate, with a medium body and great balance. This sake is Nigori style, which means it is cloudy because the rice lees are reintroduced to the finished sake after it’s brewed.

Warmth and Comfort
“Canh Măng” — Bamboo shoots, wood ear mushroom, and hand-shredded chicken in a rich chicken broth. This traditional dish symbolizes warmth and comfort and is the favorite of Northern Vietnamese people during Tết.
Paired with Chogetsu ‘Clear Moon’ – Aroma of pineapple and tropical fruits/flowers. Soft and elegant sake that has a crisp quality to it. It is light yet flavorful, ends on a refreshingly clear note with some sharpness.

History and Legend
“Bánh Chưng and Thịt Bò Kho Gừng” — An essential delicacy on the occasion of Tết, Bánh Chưng is a savory rice glutinous cake filled with mung beans and seasoned pork, wrapped in banana leaf and served with Thịt Bò Kho Gừng, ginger and star anise beef, and an assortment of pickled vegetables. A beautiful and significant tale is behind the creation of Bánh Chưng and will be shared during the dinner.
Paired with Chogetsu ‘Clear Moon’ – Aroma of pineapple and tropical fruits/flowers. Soft and elegant sake that has a crisp quality to it. It is light yet flavorful, ends on a refreshingly clear note with some sharpness.

Send-off to the Kitchen Gods
“Cá Hấp” — Steamed fish with ginger, shiitake mushroom, and glass noodles. The Vietnamese believes the Kitchen Gods, comprised of two male gods and one female, are the advocate of the Vietnamese family with the gods and the emissary between heaven to earth. As the legend goes, each year, on the 23rd of the last month of the lunar year, the Kitchen Gods leave the kitchen and ride on a fish (carp) to the heavens to give a report on each family’s doings. Then they return on the Eve of the first day of the Lunar year.
Paired with Yuri Masamune –  Mellow and rustic and has a firm structure, its nutty and earthy notes are balanced by an underlying fruitiness and it complements grilled meats, stews and fish.

Sweetness of Life
Candied ginger, lotus seeds, coconut, and sweet potato.
Paired with Jokigen Yuzu – Yuzu-shu is Japan’s native limoncello. Jokigen sources organic yuzu citrus from Kochi prefecture and mixes with premium sake and pure distillate for a refreshing and zesty beverage.

[table id=9 /]